Benjamin Hartwell

Profile

Ben focuses on identifying and executing practical solutions for clients through his particular acumen for investigations, legal research, and written advocacy. He has developed effective strategies in litigation and pre-litigation matters involving a wide range of issues in the fields of product liability, premises liability, toxic exposure, patent infringement, eminent domain, employer negligence, and contract disputes governed by the Uniform Commercial Code. 

Prior to joining Ward Greenberg, Ben served as a law clerk in the intermediate appellate court of New Jersey where he worked on groundbreaking cases pertaining to mode-of-operation liability, public access to government records, and municipal zoning rights. He also served in a variety of capacities for the federal bench, including as a year-long extern for the then-Chief Judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey. 

Among his accomplishments in law school, Ben was named Champion and “Best Orator” of the 2014 Honorable James Hunter III Moot Court Competition. He also served as Lead Articles Editor for the Rutgers University Law Review, was repeatedly recognized as a Dean’s Scholar, and received “Best Brief” awards in both introductory and advanced legal writing courses. As a native of Northeast Ohio, Ben is an avid Cleveland sports fan. When he is not in the office, he enjoys cheering for the Browns, Cavaliers, and Indians and spending time with his wife and dog.

Credentials

Education

  • Rutgers University School of Law, J.D., cum laude, 2015
  • University of Mount Union, B.A., cum laude, 2012

Admissions to Practice

  • Pennsylvania
  • New Jersey
  • U.S. District Court of Pennsylvania (Eastern)
  • U.S. District Court of New Jersey

Activities

  • American Bar Association
  • Pennsylvania Bar Association
  • New Jersey State Bar Association
  • Philadelphia Association of Defense Counsel

Presentations & PUBLICATIONS

  • “Special Laws, Court-Access, and the Impact of Tort Reform on State Equal Protection Principles.” Rutgers University Law Review, vol. 67.

Recognition

Community

Testimonials